Yucca Mountain: a MTC Exclusive Report

Mr. Trashcan has never been one to shy away from controversial topics and is not about to start today. After researching the controversy surrounding the so-called “Yucca Mountain Repository”, Mr. Trashcan felt it was time for a deep-dive into the problem. As always, Mr. Trashcan seeks out truth with the help of foremost experts in any matter and this is no exception.
Yucca Mountain Repository

Exclusive: Actual photography of the Yucca Mountain Facility taken by MTC drones

Yesterday, he had the good fortune to have lunch with internationally recognized spent rod handling expert and South Eastern Kansas dinner theatre performer of the year Dr. J Matt Witte of the University of Left Texas Special Academy for the Preservation of the Bi-lateral Sciences. It seemed like the perfect time to dig in and get to the bottom of this proposed storage facility for spent rods. So we headed to lunch. Continue reading

UFOs

From time to time, people throw paperback books into Mr. Trashcan.  It happens quite a lot, and, having almost unlimited free time, since he doesn’t go anywhere, Mr. trashcan reads these books.  Except stuff like those Tom Clancy books where people are in control and technology really works – too far fetched.
Anyway, among MT’s favorite books are the ones that are UFO-related; you know the ones I mean… there’s the classics like Eric Von Daniken and the old Zecharia Sitchen book The 12th Planet.  There’s the pretty straightforward stuff that’s desperately trying to be scientific, like the Jacques Vallee books.  And then there’s the real nutball stuff… MT remembers a rare hardback written by a real Silly Old English Colonel called Space, Gravity and the Flying Saucer that purported to describe the interior of a flying saucer, using pure deductive reasoning.
Continue reading

CS/VFM Technology

New carbon-based storage/communications technology promises cheap, permanent archive and retrieval of text and graphics.
June 27, 2009, Chapel Hill, NC —  At first glance, Dr. Buli Safid’s lab on this quiet NC campus seems like the last place you’d expect find a game-changing innovation like CS/VFM.  There are no bubbling retorts, no oscilloscopes and most conspicuously, no computer screens.  But it is in these unassuming surroundings, strewn with sheets of the material he calls “vegetable fiber mat” that he and a small group of dedicated students have created the most important advance in information technology since Gutenberg.
Continue reading